“Head Shots”

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So my final post for the evening is of our friend who is an actor, and another “first” for me in that he needed some new head shots.  I was really happy with the results! My hubby came as my assistant on this cold dreary day and found me some INCREDIBLE backdrops. Really, you can’t go wrong with old abandoned house with vintage curtains still in the windows and vines traveling up the siding! 🙂

I learned a few other things about head shots and this kind of shoot: First, that is exactly what they are – shots of someones head. They really want you to focus on the face and eyes – no extra limbs necessary. Second – eyes really are the “windows into your soul” and KEY for these kinds of pictures. So make sure they are clear and bright. Third, producers sometimes want to get a sense of your body type so one or two full length pictures aren’t necessarily a bad thing.

Hopefully, these will be good enough to land Mr. D some face to face screen tests!

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Digital 102 Assignment: Night Lights and Light Painting

My very first attempt at getting night lights!  You can't tell from this picture, but it was just after sunset and DARK!!  The only light was the passing lights of the cars.  It made me so happy to get this one first time out!! Settings: ISO2000 1/24sec f/18
My very first attempt at getting night lights! You can’t tell from this picture, but it was just after sunset and DARK!! The only light was the passing lights of the cars. It made me so happy to get this one first time out!!
Settings: ISO2000 1/24sec f/18

So I never updated you on my last week’s photography homework assignment. It was Night Lights and Light Painting. Of course it was the coldest week we’ve had to date in January since I started class, which made getting outside not so much fun. However that fact did give me an opportunity to use my new fingerless gloves that a friends surprised me with a couple weeks ago!

Also the fact that my husband was still fairly immobile made it a little hard to wander too far from home and be adventurous. I really would like to head into the city and try these again! Even still while I felt composition lacked some on the interest factor, I was thrilled to finally be able to understand the “technical” side of Night Light photography, and Light Painting.

The key ingredients are: tripod (so you eliminate camera shake with the low shutter speeds), wireless remotes or exposure timers, and low shutter speeds. The lower (or sometimes called slower) shutter speed allows the shutter to stay open longer and therefore capture as much available light as possible. For the newbies, it is also the thing that causes the streaking of car lights that you see in “city” night pictures. Since the cars are moving, the camera is capturing the light AND movement.

I was thrilled to discover the bulb setting for my shutter speed on my camera that let me determine the time elapse of my open shutter. Using my new wireless remote allowed me to really eliminate the need to touch my camera  and therefore I had almost no camera shake.  It made it so much easier!!  It amazes me how completely dark settings, can look like daytime with that option.

And for the record, my wireless remote is my new favorite photography toy!! Couldn’t have purchased it at a better time!!

Next weeks assignment is “Panning”, which is where you track a moving person or object, and capture the movement while keeping the subject in focus (more or less). Right after class my hubby and kids picked me up (they took a mini field trip to a local museum) and we headed over to a local park in the city and I already got some great shots. Can’t wait to post them. Be sure to check in Monday night or Tuesday for those.  We also have our “Field Trip” outing to a local train museum on Saturday morning!  I can’t wait.  I will be sure to post those pictures too!

Nightlights Settings: ISO 200, shutter speed 5.3 seconds, aperture f/22
Nightlights
Settings: ISO 200, shutter speed 5.3 seconds, aperture f/22
Nightlights Settings: ISO 320, shutter speed 2.9 seconds, aperture f/20
Nightlights
Settings: ISO 320, shutter speed 2.9 seconds, aperture f/20
Silhouettes Settings: ISO 200, shutter speed 1/25 seconds, aperture f/11
Silhouettes
Settings: ISO 200, shutter speed 1/25 seconds, aperture f/11
Silhouettes Settings: ISO 200, shutter speed 1/10 seconds, aperture f/11
Silhouettes
Settings: ISO 200, shutter speed 1/10 seconds, aperture f/11

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Digital 102 Metering Homework Assignment

matrix/evaluative metering - reading the light of the entire scene
matrix/evaluative metering – reading the light of the entire scene

I have to admit, I’m starting to LOVE Mondays…mostly because that’s when I get to go back to my photography class! It definitely makes starting back from the weekend much more bearable!!  This week was so crazy I wasn’t able to post my homework assignment earlier.  Our project was to take a portrait, landscape, and high contrast light in the three metering modes – matrix, spot and center-weighted. The idea was to try and see the difference in the way the camera reads light in these modes.

I think I had the most success in my high contrast light picture, where Ray was looking out our back door with only the porch light on. Poor guy, it was at the end of a long day, and he was still in pain, but he willingly modeled for me. Such a good guy!!  My portrait and landscape pictures showed less differences in the metering. However if you look close on the right side of “Tifa” (the cute little shih tzu) and the base of the tree, you can see the subtle light and detail differences.

Today in class we talked a little more in depth about composition, and different styles of photography, focusing a bit more on night photography, and light painting.  As well as the technical steps on  how to capture those difficult nighttime and low light shots.  This weeks assignment is to put some of that into practice, and I’m so excited. 

I took my first trip out tonight and got a couple cool really cool shots!  I also learned that it would be helpful to have a small flashlight with you to actually see menus on your camera, and find things like lenses that you put down after you switch out to your zoom lens!!  I almost lost my “nifty fifty” (photographer jargon for 50 mm fixed lens)  tonight in the dark…yikes!   I would have been heartbroken to loose that!

I will post soon, but after my influx of posts last night I think I will spread things out a bit!

Spot - using light from a one specific focus point,
Spot – using light from a one specific focus point,
Center-weighted - Using the light from the middle focusing point, as well as the points on either side.
Center-weighted – Using the light from the middle focusing point, as well as the points on either side.
matrix/evaluative
matrix/evaluative
Center-weighted
Center-weighted
Spot
Spot
Matrix/Evaluative
Matrix/Evaluative
Spot
Spot
Center-weighted
Center-weighted